Liz Garbus is one of the most prolific American documentary filmmakers today, and co-founder and co-President of Moxie Firecracker Films.  Garbus is a two-time Oscar Nominee, Grammy Nominee, Peabody Winner, Emmy Winner, and DGA-Nominated director. Her most recent film, Nothing Left Unsaid: Gloria Vanderbilt & Anderson Cooper (HBO) had its world premiere at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival in January. Her previous film, What Happened, Miss Simone?, a Netflix original, was nominated for a 2016 Oscar for Best Documentary Feature, it was the Opening Night Film of the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and had it’s European premiere at the Berlinale; Miss Simone was lauded by critics around the world. The film delves into the life of Nina Simone, drawing from more than 100 hours of never-before-heard audiotapes, rare concert footage, and archival interviews. 

 

Past work includes Love, Marilyn (Studiocanal & HBO), which opened as a Gala Premiere at the 2012 Toronto Film Festival and was acquired by HBO for a 2013 debut.  Hailed as “a miracle of a documentary” by Entertainment Weekly, the film utilizes a cast of A-list actors, including Adrien Brody, Glenn Close, Paul Giamatti, Uma Thurman, Viola Davis and others, reading from Monroe’s never-before-seen private writings, to bring her voice to a contemporary audience.

 

In 2011, Garbus's Bobby Fischer Against the World opened the Premiere Documentary Section of the Sundance Film Festival, was broadcast on HBO that June, and opened theatrically in Europe later that year. Hailed as “brilliant” by Entertainment Weekly, it chronicled the great Cold War showdown between Fischer and Boris Spassky in 1972. An Academy Award-Nominated and Emmy Award-Winning Producer and Director, in 2011 Garbus was nominated for her second Academy Award for the Documentary short Killing in the Name, which she produced with partner Rory Kennedy.

 

Garbus was first nominated in 1998 when she won international public and critical acclaim for her film about prison life in America, The Farm: Angola, USA. Garbus then directed Girlhood (Wellspring), which LA Weekly called “one of the most important films of the year” in 2003. Her directing credits include The Execution of Wanda Jean (Sundance & HBO, 2002), The Nazi Officer’s Wife (A&E, 2003) Coma (HBO, 2007), Shouting Fire: Stories from the Edge of Free Speech (Sundance & HBO, 2009), and There’s Something Wrong with Aunt Diane (HBO, 2011). Producing credits include Street Fight (PBS, Oscar Nominated, 2005), and Ghosts of Abu Ghraib (HBO, Emmy for Best Doc, 2007).